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Primary Conservative Treatment Results in Mortality Comparable to Surgery in Patients With Infected Pancreatic Necrosis

Published:April 26, 2010DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2010.04.011

      Background & Aims

      The standard treatment for patients with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) is surgical necrosectomy. We compared the outcomes of surgical treatment versus primary conservative treatment (patients kept in intensive care unit and treated with antibiotics, organ support, intensive nutritional support, and, if required, percutaneous drainage) among patients with IPN.

      Methods

      We performed retrospective comparative (with prospectively acquired database) and prospective observational studies; data were collected from all consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis (n = 804), and those with IPN formed the study group. Patients with IPN were divided into 2 groups on the basis of diagnosis of IPN during 1997–2002 (group 1, n = 30) or 2003–2006 (group 2, n = 50). Eighteen patients in group 1 were treated by surgical necrosectomy, and 40 patients in group 2 were given primary conservative treatment; surgery was performed on patients if conservative treatment failed (n = 10). The primary outcome measure was mortality.

      Results

      The mortality was comparable in group 1 versus group 2 (43% vs 28%; P = .22). During a period of 10 years, the patients who received primary conservative treatment had significantly higher survival rates than those who received surgery (76.9% vs 46.4%; P = .005). In the prospective study during 2007–2008, the mortality from infected necrosis was 29.6% after primary conservative treatment, confirming the results of the comparative study.

      Conclusions

      In treating patients with IPN, a primary conservative strategy resulted in mortality that was comparable with that after surgery, and 76% of the patients were able to avoid surgery; 54.5% of IPN patients were successfully managed with the primary conservative strategy.

      Keywords

      Abbreviations used in this paper:

      AP (acute pancreatitis), APACHE (Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation), CT (computed tomography), CECT (contrast-enhanced computed tomography), FNA (fine-needle aspiration), ICU (intensive care unit), IPN (infected pancreatic necrosis), SN (sterile necrosis)
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        Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005; 3: 159-166
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        • et al.
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        J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2001; 16: 1055-1059
        • Bohidar N.P.
        • Garg P.K.
        • Khanna S.
        • et al.
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        Pancreatology. 2003; 3: 9-13
        • Sharma P.K.
        • Madan K.
        • Garg P.K.
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        Pancreas. 2008; 36: 141-145